Profile and Outcome of Medical Emergencies in a Tertiary Health Institution in Port Harcourt, Nigeria

Authors

  • Maclean Rumokere Akpa Department of Internal Medicine, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt
  • Datonye Dennis Alasia Department of Internal Medicine, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt
  • Dasetima Dandeso Altraide Department of Internal Medicine, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt
  • Pedro Chimezie Emem-Chioma Department of Internal Medicine, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt
  • Ipalibo Simpson Wokoma Department of Internal Medicine, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.60787/tnhj.v13i1.154

Keywords:

Medical Emergencies, Profile, Outcome, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

Abstract

Background: Medical emergencies are a daily occurrence in medical practice. The profile and outcome medical emergencies are a reflection of the prevailing pattern of disease and the responsiveness of the healthcare system. This study seeks to evaluate the pattern and outcome of medical emergencies presenting to the university of Port Harcourt teaching hospital (UPTH), Port Harcourt.

Methods: A retrospective study of medical records of the accident and emergency unit of UPTH was assessed over a twelve month period (June 2008 May 2009).

Results: A total of 7246 patients presented to the emergency room, with 1256 (17.3%) medical emergencies. Infectious diseases accounted for 274 (21.8%) of emergencies while non-communicable diseases in the cardiovascular 195 (15.5%), renal 105 (8.4%), neurological 224 (17.8%), endocrine 163(13.0%) and gastrointestinal/ hepatobiliary 163(13.0%) systems were the other prevalent emergencies. The crude mortality rate was 127 deaths (10.2%). The major contributors to mortality were HIV/AIDS related infectious diseases (22.4%), hypertension related heart disease (18.4%) and stroke (15.7%). Other contributors to mortality were renal failure (8.8%), diabetic emergencies (8.8%), chronic liver disease (12.8%) and haematological malignancies (9.6%).

Conclusion: The spectrum of medical emergencies and the pattern of mortality indicate a mixed disease burden of infective and non-communicable diseases; with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases and HIV/AIDS related infectious as the most significant contributors. There is need for action to improve on the responsiveness of our healthcare systems to cope with this trend of disease pattern in our emergency rooms and reduce mortality from medical emergencies.

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Published

2015-12-22

How to Cite

Akpa, M. R., Alasia, D. D., Altraide, D. D., Emem-Chioma, P. C., & Wokoma, I. S. (2015). Profile and Outcome of Medical Emergencies in a Tertiary Health Institution in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. The Nigerian Health Journal, 13(1), 48. https://doi.org/10.60787/tnhj.v13i1.154

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