Determinants of catastrophic health spending among rural households in Nigeria

Authors

  • Paul Oladapo Ajayi Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria. https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0747-9969
  • Tope Michael Ipinnimo Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria.
  • Deborah T Esan Afe Babalola University Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria.
  • Oluremi Olayinka Solomon Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria.
  • Temitope Moronkeji Olanrewaju Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria.

Keywords:

Determinant, household, catastrophic health spending, rural, Nigeria

Abstract

Background: Globally, over “150 million individuals” suffer annually from catastrophic health spending mainly as a result of direct spending on healthcare services. According to the World Health Organization, “household catastrophic health spending is health spending greater than or equal to 40% of the household’s non-subsistence income”. Little is known about the determinants of household catastrophic health spending in developing countries.

Objectives: The study aims to find the determinants of household catastrophic health spending in rural Nigeria.

Methods: The study used a cross-sectional survey design to recruit 496 rural households within selected communities in Gbonyin Local government Area of Ekiti State, Nigeria. Data was collected using a pretested, interviewer-administered, and semi-structured questionnaire from 496 household heads. A multistage sampling technique was used over a period of 4month. Data analysis conducted includes univariate, bivariate, and multivariate (binary logistic analysis) analysis using STATA 12 software package and principal component analysis done to derive the wealth quartiles. Statistical significance level was set at p<0.05 and 95%CI calculated for the adjusted OR.

Results: The significant predictors associated with household catastrophic spending include the presence of a hospitalized Household member (OR=50.38, 95%CL (7.11 – 59.62) P 0.042) and the number of employed Household members greater than three (OR=0.001 95%CL (0.00-0.15), P 0.009), which were statistically significant.

Conclusion: The predictors of household catastrophic spending in the rural areas were the presence of hospitalized household members and the presence of employed household member(s). Informed targeted intervention could help reduce the burden of financial catastrophe among rural households.

Author Biographies

Paul Oladapo Ajayi, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria.

LECTURER 1 and Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria. Orcid number: https:0000-0003-0747-9969

Tope Michael Ipinnimo, Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria.

Department of Community Health, Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria. and consultant community physician

Deborah T Esan, Afe Babalola University Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria.

Reader in the Department of Nursing Science, Afe Babalola University Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria.

Oluremi Olayinka Solomon, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria.

Lecture 1 in the Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria.

Temitope Moronkeji Olanrewaju, Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria.

Consultant Family Physician in the Department of Family Medicine, Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria.

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Published

2022-10-21

How to Cite

Ajayi, P. O., Ipinnimo, T. M., Esan, D. T., Solomon, O. O., & Olanrewaju, T. M. (2022). Determinants of catastrophic health spending among rural households in Nigeria. The Nigerian Health Journal, 22(3), 278–287. Retrieved from https://www.tnhjph.com/index.php/tnhj/article/view/587

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